Weekend 35’s: to the border and back

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Recently, I ventured to the farthest reaches of the American side of Lake Champlain with two dear friends. World traveler¬†and food aficionado Erica found that the waitlist for Global Entry interviews was¬†far shorter for those willing to drive to the Canadian border than in most any other city, so we made a¬†mini road trip out of her appointment in Champlain, NY. Along the way, we ate a lot of delicious food in Burlington, took a car ferry across the lake, and received directions to the best local swimming spot from Erica’s kindly DHS officer¬†and interviewer, who provided his geographical insight¬†once he had determined that she had never been arrested. I had forgotten how dry the north country feels¬†compared to the¬†heavy sea air of¬†home. Everywhere smelled of pines.

 

Thanks to Erica for the rare shot of me and my chicken legs!

Coquelicots

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I can only surmise that a flower arrangement given to me by friends went rogue after being discarded in the compost heap last summer, because here I am, waiting¬†for poppy seed heads that I did not plant to dry. They arrived this June¬†in the vicinity of their earthly grave, a series of renewed and glorious blots¬†of watermelon set on comically long, skinny necks. I¬†thought about the women in Modigliani’s life when I looked at them.¬†Did you know the seeds sprinkle¬†out of those little arches at the top, like a salt and pepper shaker? I think I’ll sow them by the light of the next full moon, just because the earth in the meadow¬†smells nice then, and I’ve been seeing some fireflies there lately.

Lookbook: Sages, the spring/summer 2016 collection from Tracy Jonsson Design

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Had a blast photographing the spring/summer ’16 lookbook for Tracy Jonsson Design with this troupe of inspiring women.¬†You can read more about the designer and the collection¬†on Puddingstone Post, where my interview with her¬†was published this week.

Dinner in the 18th Century

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This past winter, I had the delicious joy of photographing a small dinner party of a rather unusual nature. Set against the backdrop of the Reverend Samuel Maxwell House in Warren, Rhode Island,¬†the¬†meal and its¬†costume-clad engineers¬†recreated¬†what a well-to-do Rhode Island¬†family might have served their guests in the 18th century. In the spirit of a lavish abundance of choice on the menu, three different kinds of meat were slowly cooked to perfection in a kitchen fireplace big enough to stand in, while a selection¬†of ‘drunken fruits’ emerged from their month-long bath in brandy to¬†counter the juicy, smoky¬†meats’ flavor. A rich tapestry of side dishes cloaked each table, which was all but obscured by creamware serving platters¬†by the time¬†that guests were invited to take their seats. For dessert, cups of syllabub were prefaced by a demonstration of the creamy dish’s¬†resiliency to being¬†upended, and many a cheerful glass of elderflower champagne was had before the night was through.

These dinners are meticulously crafted by members of the Massasoit Historical Association just twice a year, with very limited seating open to the public by reservation. 

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