The Gardens at Doris Duke’s Rough Point, Newport RI

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Privet hedge entrance to the perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

The perennial gardens at Doris Duke's Newport, RI estate, Rough Point | HOPE STATE STYLE | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Some photos from the garden’s of Doris Duke’s Newport estate, Rough Point, just in time for the spring flora burgeoning around us. To discover how these historic gardens have intermingled, altered, and accented the natural landscape since it was originally surveyed by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1887, be sure to check out Newport Restoration Foundation’s latest exhibition, Nature Tamed, on view at Rough Point through November 5th, 2017. My photos appear with permission from, and gratitude towards, the Newport Restoration Foundation.

Nature Tamed Logo

Summer Portrait Session in Late Afternoon Light

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What a joy it was to do a portrait session with this bright young woman. A thirteen year old with ambitions in music and theater, it was difficult not to exclaim “you look so beautiful and grown up!” at the click of every shutter (I mean, come on) but I wanted to make sure that this was about much more than simply looking nice on camera. To me, the best part about these photos is the sense that she is unafraid to celebrate who she is and to take pride in the process of documenting that. She also offered a lot of creative input, showing me all her favorite spots at her grandmother’s cherished summer home, which I felt was so important in making this a story about her. As a result, the portfolio of portraits we made are diverse in setting and light, but connected by a strong sense of place and the incredible poise and maturity that came out the moment we started shooting. This was one of the most rewarding photography experiences in recent memory, and I hope to do more projects like this. If you know any rising seniors who would like to do a senior portrait, I would love to talk to them! You can get in touch with me via email, CGoddard24@gmail.com.

Sam

Sam | Newport Art House Beta Residency | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Sam | Newport Art House Beta Residency | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Sam | Newport Art House Beta Residency | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Sam | Newport Art House Beta Residency | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Sam | Newport Art House Beta Residency | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

August was lovely for many reasons, one of which was that I got to know the very talented Samantha Katz. Friend, garden party sprite, model, muse and also one heck of a bad ass mover and shaker in the art world in both Bushwick and Newport. It was a joy to work on the Newport Art House Beta Residency project with her, thus I crowned her head in flowers from my backyard (and stalked her with my camera).

Mark + Clare

Thinking back to the deliciously warm afternoon in August of 2013 when Mark and Clare tied the knot on First Beach in Newport, RI. What a fun couple with a hilarious troupe of friends and family to share in their laughs, their incredibly touching vows and their epic dance party! Their sweetness and joy are like a nice hot toddy for the omg-winter-getmeout soul.

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Mark + Clare | Hope State Style | Photo by Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

I’m so excited to collaborate with the Newport Historical Society on a series of posts exploring their historic properties around the city. Earlier this year, I photographed The Great Friends Meeting House and fell a little bit in love with the restrained architecture, the grey-green and white color scheme, and the wooden pews scattered throughout the building. Despite the sparing interiors, the things worth photographing were endless, especially all the smallest details of the hand-hewn structure. It’s an incredible building with a lot of potential for bringing people together, as was its original purpose. Coming up July 17th, The Island Moving Company will lend motion and life to the space with the Great Friends Dance Festival.

A few notes about the meeting house and its history from NHS:

• Quakers arrived in Newport in the mid-17th century.

•The meeting house was built in 1699. It’s the oldest surviving house of worship in Newport.

• It’s considered post medieval English vernacular architecture.

• As described by Rev. George Keith, “large enough to hold 500 persons or more, with fair and large galleries, and forms or benches below.”

• The structural timbers are made from oak.

• The present north wing called the North Meeting, a two story gable roofed structure measuring about 40 x 45 feet, was added in 1729. The second story of this addition has long been known as the “old ship room” because of the curving ceiling beams. The size of the building was tripled in 1807, when a new wing was constructed on the south side of the building.

• Restoration began in 1967 and it was donated to the Newport Historical Society.

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For more details about the property visit:

Explore Historic Newport, the NHS app

The NHS website: http://www.newporthistory.org

 

Thank you to Elizabeth Sulock and the rest of NHS for getting me involved, showing me around and giving me a mini history lesson!

Norman Before Leaves

Without its deciduous canopy, the Shady Glade trail at the Norman Bird Sanctuary is light-filled and pleasantly architectural.  Above a tidy stand of trunks the branches twist together, unclad and silhouetted in the strong light, but it will only be a few weeks until they retreat behind dense boughs of foliage.  For those en route to Hanging Rock in summer, this will be a cool and peaceful place to rest._MG_0578

Admission to the Bird Sanctuary is $6 per person, but individual memberships can be purchased for $40, which grants you free access for the year.  This fee goes towards helping the organization preserve over 300 acres of wildlife refuge and provide environmental programming, education and outreach in the community.

It’s a great place to go on a date, and I always bring visiting friends up to see the view from Hanging Rock.  When I travel I like to get the lay of the land from some high vantage point; it makes me feel much more connected to and aware of the place that I am visiting, and I try to create that experience for my houseguests.  Still, my most productive walks are usually the ones I take alone.  If you make your way to the Shady Glade, you might find me sitting there, thinking hard.

Visit www.normanbirdsanctuary.org for more information.