Dinner in the 18th Century

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This past winter, I had the delicious joy of photographing a small dinner party of a rather unusual nature. Set against the backdrop of the Reverend Samuel Maxwell House in Warren, Rhode Island,¬†the¬†meal and its¬†costume-clad engineers¬†recreated¬†what a well-to-do Rhode Island¬†family might have served their guests in the 18th century. In the spirit of a lavish abundance of choice on the menu, three different kinds of meat were slowly cooked to perfection in a kitchen fireplace big enough to stand in, while a selection¬†of ‘drunken fruits’ emerged from their month-long bath in brandy to¬†counter the juicy, smoky¬†meats’ flavor. A rich tapestry of side dishes cloaked each table, which was all but obscured by creamware serving platters¬†by the time¬†that guests were invited to take their seats. For dessert, cups of syllabub were prefaced by a demonstration of the creamy dish’s¬†resiliency to being¬†upended, and many a cheerful glass of elderflower champagne was had before the night was through.

These dinners are meticulously crafted by members of the Massasoit Historical Association just twice a year, with very limited seating open to the public by reservation. 

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Barnhouse – Chilmark, Martha’s Vineyard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Barnhouse - Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Photos from my stay with friends at Barnhouse, an artist’s summer colony in Chilmark, Martha’s Vineyard. Everywhere I turned, there was something interesting to look at, or hear about on this historic site. The¬†property preserves a beautiful tract of land that was farmed from the late 17th century until its purchase and conversion to a communal retreat in the 1920s, and the architectural significance of the original farm¬†house, barn, stone walls and livestock enclosures are part of the reason that it received its historic site designation by the National Register of Historic Places in 2011.

But what I loved the most about Barnhouse was the 20th century story, and the fact that the vision of a group of idealistic, liberal socialites Рwho were perhaps reacting to a period of excess and post-war, political discontent when they formed the colony in the 1920s Рcontinues today: the small cabin accommodations are intentionally rustic, the barn functions as a shared activity and eating space, and everyone participates in daily chores and the running of things when they stay.

The sparsely furnished cabins, outfitted with chamber pots, laundry lines and floral linens, were an endless source of inspiration for me and my little Pentax, as were the seasons of accumulated art, beach stones and salt-sprayed paperbacks left by guests past. Of course, the other amazing thing about Barnhouse was the food, prepared by chef Betsy Carnie and lovingly presented each day with colorful, edible flower petals and other delights from the kitchen garden.

I didn’t really feel like shooting a whole lot of digital on my vacation, so most of this is 35mm. When I’m working on a photography job, I put so much pressure for perfection on myself, which comes out as a near¬†frenetic¬†intensity¬†to¬†‘get the shot,’ check the¬†image,¬†read the histogram, and reshoot if needed, all in as little time as possible so as not to miss anything (I think that’s the wedding photography training that I just can’t kick). Since that’s not possible with film, I can enjoy the process of the capture a little more. I take one, maybe¬†two shots¬†of what I see, and then let it go. If it turns out, great. If it doesn’t, it doesn’t. Meanwhile, I’m not buried in the back of my camera with something interesting right in front of me. I take the shot, and then I enjoy it with my own two eyes for a little longer. And besides, with film, I expect a little imperfection in each photo, otherwise, what’s the point?

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For more information about Barnhouse, here is an interesting lecture given by Dr. Bruce Clouette on the history and significance of the property.

 

Eat / New Orleans pt. I

Eat / New Orleans pt. I | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard | Satsuma, New Orleans

Eat/ New Orleans pt. I | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard |George Rodrique, Aioli Dinner, 1971 | The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans

Finally finding some time to piece together my trip to New Orleans a few weeks back. I took over 8 rolls of film! Now the fun is stringing them into vignettes and recalling all the yummy food I had. Photos of Satsuma Café, a great little spot in the Bywater, and a painting by George Rodrigue, Aioli Dinner (1974), at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

 

Satsuma

3218 Dauphine St, New Orleans, LA

504 304 5962

 

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art

925 Camp St, New Orleans, LA

504 539 9650

Marshfield, VT [Part II]

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Hope State Style | Marshfield, VT | Caroline Goddard Photography

Photos of the Hollister Hill Farm’s self-serve stand and barns in Marshfield, VT. I tried raw milk for the first time and it was incredible! Generally, I’m border-line lactose intolerant but ignore it in the name of good cheese, but when we arrived at the farm after hiking the rolling hills that lay between it and Justin’s house, I was so thirsty that I drank the whole pint glass the farmer had given me to try. You know how milk generally needs to go with something? Cookies, or chocolate or peanut butter? Not so with this milk- it was perfect on its own and made me feel great. The farm was a beautiful model of how a small-scale, well run dairy and meat operation can produce plenty of delicious food and still provide a healthy and high quality of life for all the animals.

// more on Marshfield //

Marshfield, VT {part I]

// more on food and farms //

When Farmers Wore Elegant Tophats

my brief stint as an olive harvester in the Cycladic islands – I wasn’t that good at it. I sort of just took pictures the whole time.

my cousin’s wedding on her organic dairy farm

an herbaceous obsession

and lastly: idealistic foodie college students in a sustainable agriculture class = the most brilliant source of free labor a CSA could hope for! Took these before I had photoshop…my, how far we’ve come.