Family Sail on an Old Friend: The Classic Alden Yawl “Hope San”

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Photos from a sail on Narragansett Bay¬†aboard¬†the classic Alden yawl “Hope San” for my dad’s birthday. It may have taken us several decades, but we finally figured out what to give him each year. Hope San was actually once my grandparents’ boat (one of the two Hopes that inspired this blog title, the other being my maternal grandmother), and has since been lovingly restored by IYRS grad Patrick Abrecht and his wife Monika. It made me smile to see my dad reconnecting with a boat on which he spent so much time with his parents (see cutely boyish pensive shots on the bow). Hope San¬†can now be chartered in and around Newport RI for up to six guests. You can find out more at sailonhopesan.com.¬†

All images were shot with Portra 160 35mm film on a Pentax K-1000. Thank you to my family for being my models and guinea pigs, I wasn’t sure how I would like Portra in intense sunlight, but it turns out the blue-green tones suited my needs in this aqueous environ just fine.¬†¬†And thanks¬†mom for the shot of me, it’s nice to have my presence in situations confirmed every now and again. (that’s me¬†decked in a double denim¬†jorts + chambray top combo. My earrings are from my new jewelry obsession,¬†Rackk +¬†Ruin¬†in Burlington, VT.)

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving | Hope State Style | Photos by Caroline Goddard

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving | Hope State Style | Photos by Caroline Goddard

Indigo Intensive at the Marshfield School of Weaving

Some 35’s from my weeklong stay at the Marshfield School of Weaving in August, where I finally did their four day¬†Indigo Intensive, and naturally had as much fun taking photos as I did plunking stuff into vats. It’s always an amazing experience to drop into a different world for a little while, and truly, there is a magic to¬†everything in¬†the Northeast Kingdom. Even their breakfast sandwiches¬†are like a holy experience, what with the bacon, the eggs and the cheese coming from right up the road, and the bagels baked each day in house¬†(when within 25 miles of Plainfield, my advice to you is this: go to Hestia Espresso Bar¬†and you shall not be sorry).

For this workshop, we started by learning a bit about the history of indigo, which is really referring to a chemical compound found in a variety of plants across the globe (thus we have Indian indigo, woad, Japanese indigo, etc. that have all been a part of these cultures for centuries). Then we jumped right in to learning about four different fermentation vats and how to properly prepare fabrics and fibers to accept dye. After that, it was all fun and games with shibori, block printing, and overdyes.

To see a complete listing of courses offered, head to marshfieldschoolofweaving.com.

The Backyard Summer Art Series – Newport, RI

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

The Backyard Summer Art Series | Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard Photography

Looking forward to the next installment of the¬†Backyard Summer Art Series,¬†which is brought to this little one boat town by¬†A Common Practice and highlights the work of Newport’s growing artist community. July’s¬†event was¬†full of goodly things made by goodly folk, but I was too distracted by the crowd and my camera to buy¬†anything.¬†

Work featured here includes:

Ellen Hyde, Tracy Jonsson, John Baldaia, Able Thought, SALT: Writers Collective, Brittany Mathis, Dara Gardner, Nick Aprea, Ape & Bird, Joseph Marshall.

The 17th Century English Village at Plimoth Plantation

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

17th Century English Village - Plimoth Plantation | Hope State Style | Photography by Caroline Goddard

A few photos from my visit to Plimoth Plantation last November. The light in the 17th century English Village made everything feel like a Dutch painting, and I found it so inspiring to see how these dwellings, however rudimentary,¬†were still beautiful. There was hardly a detail on them or an object within them that didn’t serve a purpose, but the functional forms were still aesthetically intriguing, like the woven smoke hole at the peak of the gable in the last photo. The house had one on each end,¬†so that a strong cross breeze would create a draft to pull the smoke up and out without a chimney.

Seeing these spaces prompted me to think hard about the inventory of goods in my own home. We have SO MUCH stuff in our lives today, and we throw so much away and buy more to replace it. Yikes. I know that I’m not making any¬†ground-breaking revelations about consumerism,¬†and I don’t want to romanticize the pilgrims of Plymouth any more than they already are. But, I really did have a moment there, where I appreciated that things should be more precious to us. Boy that sounds anti-anti-materialistic. But if you think about it, it’s not.

I need to make another trip out there- I’m sure the little veggie gardens behind each house will be beautiful in the summer, and I want to spend some time photographing at the Wampanoag Homesite. Plus, the Mayflower II is undergoing a big restoration and was closed to the public while I was there. It will be exciting to see her fitted out and back in action. Anyway, just thought I would share these little snippets of thought and image, in case anyone else needs a little nest¬†inspiration to get them through the Ides of March.

 

Tintype or Bust

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Tintype or Bust | Hope State Style | Cole Caswell, AGNO3 Lab at The Common Ground Country Fair, Unity, ME | Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association | Photography by Caroline Goddard

Victory! I’ve wanted to get a tintype done for my professional portrait ever since I saw Giles Clement in action at the 2014 Newport Folk Fest. Nothing quite so haunting as watching the faces of the world’s best folk music¬†emerge from the murky depths of iron and emulsion beneath the arch of an aging fort. So, when I came across a tintype artist¬†at the Common Ground Country Fair in Unity, Maine last September, I went for it. Thanks to Cole Caswell of AgNO3 Lab for the lovely shot. The booth and the developing process were inspiration in and of themselves, so I thought I would share a few photos.

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Ps – proud to be sporting my Greek bread bag in the photo, handwoven in the hills of Paros by this amazing woman.