Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Great Friends Meeting House, Newport, RI | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

I’m so excited to collaborate with the Newport Historical Society on a series of posts exploring their historic properties around the city. Earlier this year, I photographed The Great Friends Meeting House and fell a little bit in love with the restrained architecture, the grey-green and white color scheme, and the wooden pews scattered throughout the building. Despite the sparing interiors, the things worth photographing were endless, especially all the smallest details of the hand-hewn structure. It’s an incredible building with a lot of potential for bringing people together, as was its original purpose. Coming up July 17th, The Island Moving Company will lend motion and life to the space with the Great Friends Dance Festival.

A few notes about the meeting house and its history from NHS:

• Quakers arrived in Newport in the mid-17th century.

• The meeting house was built in 1699. It’s the oldest surviving house of worship in Newport.

• It’s considered post medieval English vernacular architecture.

• As described by Rev. George Keith, “large enough to hold 500 persons or more, with fair and large galleries, and forms or benches below.”

• The structural timbers are made from oak.

• The present north wing called the North Meeting, a two story gable roofed structure measuring about 40 x 45 feet, was added in 1729. The second story of this addition has long been known as the “old ship room” because of the curving ceiling beams. The size of the building was tripled in 1807, when a new wing was constructed on the south side of the building.

• Restoration began in 1967 and it was donated to the Newport Historical Society.

• For more details about the property visit:

Explore Historic Newport, the NHS app

The NHS website: http://www.newporthistory.org

 

Thank you to Elizabeth Sulock and the rest of NHS for getting me involved, showing me around and giving me a mini history lesson!

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

 

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

Yiannis Making Sandals + Playing Harmonica | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

 

I’ve been thinking a lot about things, lately. Mostly, how I am tired of them. The nondescript and the useless diluting the functional and the meaningful until all of it feels like rubbish. I’m having a yard sale shindig this Saturday and I can’t wait to get rid of the stuff cluttering my life while listening to a live bluegrass band in my backyard with friends. If you’re a pal of Hope State Style, ping me for the details, I’d love to see you there!

It’s true I like to pick things. Browsing Salvation Army, scanning the streets on trash night (just scored a Marcel Breuer Wassily B3 chair in need of restoration), bringing things home from my travels … all favorite pastimes. But it doesn’t always follow that I want to live with them. Maybe I need to have a store at some point. It’s just exercise for my eye, a challenge for my brain and a thrill when I find something no one else is looking for.

I decided to pull out these photos this week when the strap of my sandal broke.

Yiannis is the gregarious old flirt who would not sell me those sandals until I had drunk three glasses of farmer’s jug wine with him in his little workshop and store in Paroikia, Greece. We became friends during my time on the island, and enjoyed talking about music. I shared with him the Greek pieces I was working on with my vocal ensemble, and he played me some harmonica tunes.

I thought I would be more upset about them breaking, but all I could think of was, “time to go back.”

With Richard, New Orleans

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

With Richard, New Orleans | Hope State Style | Caroline Goddard

While visiting New Orleans this spring, I spent a day shooting with my cousin, Charlotte, and her friend, Richard McCabe. Richard is the curator of photography at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, and is currently obsessed with his Polaroid camera, which is understandable given the prints he was getting on our shooting excursion. Sometimes I feel like I snap into different personalities as a photographer depending on who I’m with and where. I shoot very differently when I’m thinking about a travel post for the blog, or capturing a wedding, versus just playing. I’d say my attitude that day, and the resulting films, fell into the latter category. Thanks to Richard, we got to see many different sides of New Orleans, too.

Hopestate-Feature-on-Wordpress

Hope State Style featured on the WordPress Blog!

I got a nice surprise one day this May when I opened up my blog dashboard- a huge spike in views and follows and some lovely comments that alerted me to the fact that I had been featured on the WordPress blog! Even though I’d probably still be writing this thing if the only person reading it was my mom (hi, mom!) it’s always nice to know that others are taking the time to visit me. I’m truly honored! Thanks to all for stopping in. You can see the article, which is part of their Early Theme Adaptors series, here.